A collection of art and other things I've found on the tumblr sphere. None of this is mine. For my art, visit my Art blog here:




My Art Blog

toxicnotebook:

Illustrator Sunday: J.C. Leyendecker (Part Two)

I took your silence as ‘no one would mind’.

Scanned from the Culter & Culter J.C. Leyendecker book.

beautiesofafrique:

African ethnic group of the week: The Fulani people

Fulani people are one of the largest ethnolinguistic groups in Africa, numbering approximately 40 million people in total. They form one of the most widely dispersed and culturally diverse of the peoples of Africa. The Fulani are bound together by the common language of Fulfulde, as well as by some basic elements of Fulbe culture, such as The pulaaku , a code of conduct common to all Fulani groups. The Wodaabe (Fula: Woɗaaɓe) or Bororo and Toroobe are small subgroups of the Fulani ethnic group.

African countries where they are present include Mauritania, Ghana, Senegal, Guinea, Gambia, Mali, Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Benin, Burkina Faso, Guinea Bissau, Cameroon, Côte d’Ivoire, Niger, Chad, Togo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan the Central African Republic, Liberia, and as far East as the Red Sea in Sudan and Egypt. With the exception of Guinea, where the Fula make up an ethnic plurality (largest single ethnic group) or approximately 40%+ of the population, Fulas are minorities in every country they live in. So, most also speak other dominant languages of the countries they inhabit, making many Fulani bilingual or even trilingual in nature. Such languages include Hausa, Bambara, Wolof, Arabic, 

Historically, the Fulani played a significant role in the rise and fall of ancient African empires such as Ghana, Mali, Songhai and the Mossi states. They greatly contributed to the spread of Islam throughout Western Africa. More recently, slavery and colonialism dispersed Fulani throughout the Middle East, the Americas and Europe. 

Fulani people were among the first Africans to convert to Islam. Between the eighth and the fourteenth century, Fulbe-speaking people of Takrur had produced a class of Muslim clerics, the Torodbe, who would take on proselytizing activities across the entire western Sudan. Increasingly, the memory of their previous pastoral religion was lost, except in some sub-groups such as the Bororo or Wodaabe (i.e., “Isolated”), who remained animists and nomads. Between the eleventh and the seventeenth century, the Fulbe gradually extended their grazing territory from over much of the West African savanna up to Borno. They usually took no part in the political life of the surrounding entities, and were sometimes subjected to heavy taxes.

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shaburdies:

I went to my first Toons On Tap session on Wednesday where my friend Gilly-kins modelled as Sailor Jupiter! It was so fun and I hope to do it again!

Tutorial : Making rubber stamp

gatarooooo:

How to make a rubber stamp done by gataro.

image

First, you need these materials:

A. Rubber block or eraser

B. Ink pads

C, HB pencil

D. Craft knife

E. Your drawing

F. Kneadable eraser

G. Tracing paper

image

Design your stamp and draw on paper.

image

Place the tracing paper on the image…

smilelikelightning:

yourscientistfriend:

textiles:

I may have taught this spider to knit. I was finishing the last 20 rows at the park, when this little spider wandered over to me, It climbed up my knitting bag, and walked all up and down the piece, then climbed onto my hand and watched me for a couple rows. After the second row it started waving it’s front four legs as if to get my attention. Once I was looking at it, it started pulling silk from its spinneret, and fiddling with it. I don’t know if it was knitting or purling as it was quite small scale, but every few seconds it would stop and look up at me to see if I was still watching. After a little bit I moved it to one of the vines overhanging the archway I was sitting in, and it went about its business.This wasn’t the only unusual thing that happened at the park today, but it was the most unusual.

Maybe it thought you were a spider

I’m gonna level with you that’s the fucking cutest shit I have ever fucking heard of okay I want a little spider that knits not sits menacingly above my bed at night threatening to fall into my mouth.

smilelikelightning:

yourscientistfriend:

textiles:

I may have taught this spider to knit. 
I was finishing the last 20 rows at the park, when this little spider wandered over to me, It climbed up my knitting bag, and walked all up and down the piece, then climbed onto my hand and watched me for a couple rows. 
After the second row it started waving it’s front four legs as if to get my attention. Once I was looking at it, it started pulling silk from its spinneret, and fiddling with it. I don’t know if it was knitting or purling as it was quite small scale, but every few seconds it would stop and look up at me to see if I was still watching. After a little bit I moved it to one of the vines overhanging the archway I was sitting in, and it went about its business.
This wasn’t the only unusual thing that happened at the park today, but it was the most unusual.

Maybe it thought you were a spider

I’m gonna level with you that’s the fucking cutest shit I have ever fucking heard of okay I want a little spider that knits not sits menacingly above my bed at night threatening to fall into my mouth.

scott-gwynn:

This past week I’ve been wanting to get back into painting in the evening… Here’s how well that went :)

phiftycent:

policymic:

16-year-old dresses as every culture and counterculture of the last 100 years

Flapper. Beatnick. Hippie. Hipster. 

In her project “Counter // Culture,” 16-year-old photographer Annalisa Hartlaub captures all the mainstream and countercultural movements that have defined the last 10 decades. The results are a stirring series of portraits that bring life to a century of women, contextualizing how the friction of mainstream and counterculture defined progression. 

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this is dope

(Source: micdotcom)